The threat to Burma’s minorities

first_imgBurma’s Rohingya people are being slowly squeezed from their homeland by decades-long government policies that critics say deny them citizenship, health care, work, and schooling, with such tactics punctuated by killings, destroyed homes, and tens of thousands sent to camps.That was the picture painted by Harvard scholars and Burmese activists who gathered in Cambridge to discuss what they described as the slow genocide of Burma’s Rohingya, a Muslim minority in the Buddhist-majority country that has endured a wide array of abuse at the hands of the former military government.Though the international community has welcomed steps toward Burmese democracy in recent years, the situation for the Rohingya has improved little, speakers said Tuesday. The Rohingya, who have a long history in Burma, which is also known as Myanmar, remain a stateless people, denied citizenship and subject not just to official oppression, but also to violence from the local Rakhine people, as evidenced by the 2012 riots that displaced 90,000 inhabitants.In a related development, researchers at the International Human Rights Clinic at Harvard Law School released a report this week detailing alleged war crimes and crimes against humanity by the Burmese military against another ethnic group, the Karen, who live near the country’s border with Thailand.The report named three high-ranking officers in charge of a 2005-2008 campaign against the Karen and said that villagers were “indiscriminately attacked,” civilians were “captured and executed,” and tens of thousands were displaced during the campaign.Malik Mujahid, chair of the Parliament of the World’s Religions and president of Justice for All, showed aerial photos of neighborhoods burned to ash. He said the residents of these neighborhoods were marched off to internment camps, where 140,000 live today, often without enough to eat. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer“To break the prevailing cycles of violence in Myanmar, there is a need for concerted effort to reform military policies and practices that have fueled indiscriminate attacks against innocent civilians,” the report said. “Scrutiny into other military operations, particularly those that are ongoing, is also warranted.”The Rohingyas’ troubles can be traced to a 1982 citizenship law that failed to list them among the nation’s indigenous people. Instead, they were classified as Muslim immigrants from neighboring Bangladesh, and denied citizenship. Subsequent campaigns have turned not just official policy against them, but also public opinion, something that would have to change for the situation to be remedied, according to Thomas W. Lamont University Professor Amartya Sen.“In order to win this battle, I think the support of the people is absolutely essential — who have been fed lies,” Sen said.Sen said it is important that the international community pressure the government to change its policy and restore citizenship to the group, and implement educational campaigns to change the minds of the broader population.The Loeb House discussion, titled “The Slow-Burning Genocide of Rohingyas,” was intended to review the situation and develop a research agenda for work to provide a foundation for advocacy and identify possible interventions. The session featured several members of the Rohingya refugee community and representatives of groups interested in humanitarian issues, such as the Parliament of the World’s Religions, Physicians for Human Rights, the nonprofit China Medical Board, and the British think tank Overseas Development Institute.Harvard faculty and researchers involved included Sen; Felicia Knaul, associate professor of global health and social medicine and associate professor of medicine; and Maung Zarni, a lecturer on global health and social medicine. The event was convened by the Harvard Global Equity Initiative, which Knaul directs, together with partner organizations.In introductory remarks, Knaul said that research into the situation is important and that resulting evidence can inform advocacy. She also said that the problem is personal to her, since her father survived the Nazi death camp at Auschwitz and much of the rest of her family was killed in the Holocaust.Wakar Uddin is pictured in Loeb House at Harvard University. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff PhotographerSen said it is important that the word “genocide” not be tossed around lightly, and he acknowledged that this situation looks different from the murderous examples of Nazi Germany and 1994 Rwanda. Still, he said, the term applies in this case, with lives lost not just to the outbursts of violence, but also to the denial of healthcare and the right to work.Malik Mujahid, chair of the Parliament of the World’s Religions and president of Justice for All, showed aerial photos of neighborhoods burned to ash. He said the residents of these neighborhoods were marched off to internment camps, where 140,000 live today, often without enough to eat.Those Rohingya who live outside the camps are barred from attending school, holding jobs, or traveling freely. They must obtain government permission to marry and are limited to having just two children. Hundreds of them leave the country daily, he said, risking dangerous travel on overcrowded boats to become refugees in Bangladesh, Thailand, and other nearby nations.Tun Khin, a Rohingyan refugee, was born in Burma and grew up there. He and his parents fled the country in the 1970s for Bangladesh. They were repatriated to Burma, and eventually fled a second time. Today, he is a refugee living in the United Kingdom, neither a Burmese citizen nor a foreigner. He called for support to relieve the Rohingyas’ “collective nightmare.”Another refugee, Daw Kin Hla, said she was born in Burma in 1952 and had worked as a middle school teacher before leaving the country. Rohingya civil servants, she said, have been forced to retire or quit their jobs. Today, she said, her family is fractured, with her husband living with her in the U.K., a son in Germany, and a son and daughter in the United States.U Ba Sein, another Rohingya refugee living in Britain, traced the oppression to the late 1970s. He said he saw people physically abused by army personnel, tied up and marched off, and heard stories of rapes and killings.Zarni, who co-authored the 2014 report “The Slow-Burning Genocide of Myanmar’s Rohingya” in the Pacific Rim Law and Policy Journal, detailed official and popular narratives in Burma that call the Rohingya illegal immigrants, a threat to national security, “viruses” and “invaders,” a threat to Buddhist culture, and economic blood-suckers.However, he said that contrary to the government’s assertions, the Rohingya have always lived in Burma. There are records of them dating back to the colonial period in 1790, and they were recognized by the post-independence Burmese government.“They did not come from anywhere else. The Rohingya are there on their ancestral land,” Zarni said.last_img read more

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Science Friday to tape at ND

first_imgThe College of Science’s sesquicentennial celebration will continue on Wednesday night with the taping of “Science Friday” in the?Leighton Concert Hall of the DeBartolo Performing Arts Center (DPAC) at 7 p.m. to a sold-out crowd. Science Friday, an NPR radio talk show dedicated to science news and entertainment stories, airs every Friday on NPR affiliate stations from 2-4 p.m. EST.Host and producer Ira Flatow will interview three Notre Dame faculty members as part of the show in addition to at least four other non-Notre Dame guests, according to Marissa Gebhard, assistant director of marketing and communications for the College of Science and a 1998 graduate of Saint Mary’s College.The show will be divided into six segments, and the Notre Dame Glee Club will sing “science-themed songs” in between, Gebhard said.Associate professor Philippe Collon, who specializes in experimental nuclear physics, will speak about the applications of his research on the world of art. Through his research, Collon has developed a method of revealing counterfeit artwork without destroying the sample taken as happens with chemical analysis, according to Gebhard.“He uses nuclear physics to pinpoint the age, date, and material of artwork,” Gebhard said. “Collon will be joined by Greg Smith from the Indianapolis Museum of Art, and together they are going to talk about combating counterfeit art.”Collon’s work centers on “radionuclides,” or radioactive isotopes, which are atoms with unstable nuclei. Radiocarbon dating uses?relative amounts of certain types of these isotopes?to date artwork and determine authenticity.“The field I work in is called Accelerator Mass Spectrometry or AMS for short. It basically is a very sensitive detection technique that combines accelerators and nuclear physics detection techniques to allow the detection of radionuclides at extremely low concentrations (i.e. the ‘needle in the haystack’),” Collon said in an email.“This technique has applications in art and archaeology,” Collon said. “I got particularly interested in this through the development of the ‘Physics Methods in Art and Archaelogy’ course—PHYS 10262—with my colleague Michael Wiescher. We have now been teaching this course for over eight years here at Notre Dame and it is a fantastic way of introducing modern physics through the bias of art and archaeology to numerous students who would not traditionally be taking a modern physics course.”Jeanne Romero-Severson, professor of biology, will kick off the Science Friday taping, Gebhard said.“Jeanne Romero-Severson, who studies plant microbiomes, will be the first segment,” Gebhard said. “She does a lot of work related to the health of oak trees. Her research has implications for outbreaks of foodborne illness linked to contaminated seed sprouts, and she’s working to combat those bacterial infections.”In the program’s third segment, David Lodge, founder and director of the Notre Dame Environmental Change Initiative, will speak about the ecology of the Great Lakes. Lodge is currently on a one-year leave as a Jefferson Science Fellow in the U.S. Department of State.“[Lodge] is a world-renowned expert on invasive species,” Gebhard said. “He is one of the faculty that is in the media the most of all of the Notre Dame faculty. He studies Asian carp and some other invasive species, which is of particular interest to everyone in the Great Lakes area, as we spend millions and millions of dollars trying to clean them up.”Other guests to the show will include representatives from Studebaker to discuss their electric car, forensic science professor Anne Perez from Saint Joseph’s College, who will discuss her work in forensic entomology and interviews with the Kellogg brothers with University of Michigan professor Howard Markel, according to the College of Science press release.Tags: College of Science, DPAC, Physics, plants, Science Fridaylast_img read more

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Colombian Navy, Air Force Work Together to Combat Drug Trafficking

first_imgBy Marian Romero/Diálogo August 09, 2016 Joint operations run by Colombia’s Navy and Air Force (FAC, for its Spanish acronym) have become an effective in shutting down drug trafficking routes. In just two operations in June, authorities seized more than a metric ton of cocaine hydrochloride in different areas of Colombia’s territorial waters in the Caribbean. Colombian Navy intelligence, together with information from U.S. Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) allowed Coast Guard stations in the cities of Santa Marta and Cartagena to interdict the vessels in one operation. However, in both instances, the FAC’s 3rd Combat Air Command guided the Navy’s rapid response units from the air. “Partnering with the FAC has been very beneficial because it provides intelligence from the air that would be slower and less precise from the water. The surveillance area that an aircraft can cover is 10 times larger than that of a ship. It also provides the exact coordinates of the suspicious vessel’s location, which makes for more efficient interdictions,” said Admiral Leonardo Santamaría, commander of the Colombian Navy. Adm. Santamaria explained that the armed forces of all affected countries have had to work together in the fight against international drug trafficking in order to comprehensively manage the situation and prevent the so-called balloon effect – in which the air within a latex balloon that is squeezed moves to a different area but never goes away – with crop eradication and drug trafficking suppression in Latin America. So far this year, the joint operations between the Navy and the FAC have resulted in the immobilization of nine vessels. This contributed to the Navy seizing a total of 72 metric tons of alkaloids to date in all of its operations, with and without the support of other institutions. FAC Support Because Colombia’s coasts front both the Caribbean Sea and the Pacific Ocean, the immense maritime space under the responsibility of the Navy led to the need for the partnership. The Colombian Navy and the FAC first began working together on naval interdiction operations in 2007. Since then, the collaboration has grown stronger. Although the success of the joint collaboration is not evident in the number of detained vessels each year due to current data not yet showing a specific trend, the communication methodology and logistics make this partnership an important strategy to combat drug trafficking. “The illegal use of airspace to traffic drugs has dropped by 99 percent, so a decision was made to include missions against illegal maritime traffic as one of the points of the FAC’s doctrine,” explained Colonel Iván Darío Bocanegra, director of FAC Air Defense. “This change has optimized our airspace use and allowed us to increase our use of the means and resources available to carry out national defense operations.” The Air Bridge Denial Agreement between the FAC and the U.S. Government concerning illicit air trafficking interdiction took effect in 2003. Known as the ABD Agreement, it allowed authorities to track and analyze aerial targets, disable illegal airstrips used by drug traffickers, among other strategies, which, in turn, led to the almost 100 percent elimination of airborne drug trafficking. With this positive outcome, the agreement was expanded in 2007 to include FAC air resources in support of suppressing illegal maritime trafficking of narcotic drugs and psychotropic substances, known as SSIMT. Naval interdiction is the process of boarding, inspecting, and searching a vessel suspected of engaging in illegal activity. If the suspicion is confirmed, the people on board the vessel are arrested and the illegal cargo is seized. The Colombian Navy is responsible for this part of the operation. The intelligence work is carried out by the Navy, although it can also be performed by the police or U.S. Southern Command. Based on that information, the FAC flies over a specific section of the ocean to find the illegal vessel from the air, whether it is a go-fast boat or a semi-submersible. Once the target has been sighted, the pilot relays the exact coordinates and acts as a guide for a Navy vessel to perform the interdiction. “The operations are performed as discreetly as possible. We fly high enough that we generate no noise that could alert the criminals. Usually, when they feel cornered, they throw the merchandise overboard to reduce their sentence,” Col. Bocanegra explained. “The success of the SSIMT operations lies in the communication between all armed forces involved and in the coordination orchestrated by the Colombian Navy.” Patrolling Both Oceans “Historically, drugs have primarily been trafficked by sea. Outlaws have preferred to travel by sea, even though it takes much longer than an aircraft, because it allows them to carry more weight at less cost,” Adm. Santamaría said. “A go-fast boat can be loaded down with 1.5 metric tons and a semi-submersible with 6 metric tons, but an airplane can only carry a few kilograms. That is why most of the problems occur at sea.” The Colombian Air Force is not the only organization patrolling the vast maritime space. It also has the support of all Central American countries and of the United States. Defense accords focused on combating drug trafficking have made it possible to achieve more effective control. The challenge for these operations is to continue to standardize doctrine and provide training as needed to task forces to carry out increasingly precise interdictions as well as to reduce the amount of drugs trafficked by sea. “With the momentum of the accords we have been implementing for several years now, we’ve set up effective fronts for neutralizing the criminals’ vessels. We have created doctrinal unity and a network of resources has been set up to tactically detect enemies,” Adm. Santamaría said. “Each interdiction operation draws on the resources available along the illegal vessel’s route. It could be an aircraft from one country, a boat or ship from another and so on, until the final mission is completed.”last_img read more

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Former Binghamton priest and a former Catholic school teacher accused in new Child Victims Act lawsuit

first_imgLaFave says the Child Victims Act still protects victims, despite the bankruptcy and encourages anyone who may need help to call the state’s hotline. Not only are they representing for charges against Madore, but they are also the attorneys for victims filing cases against former St. John the Evangelist school and Seton Catholic Central school teacher, James Francis Purtell. Stippel says Purtell is accused of sexually abusing two minors and is believed to still live in the Binghamton area. Many of the victims are just now coming forward because the Child Victims Act signed into law by Governor Cuomo in 2019 opens a “one year look back window” in which anyone who was under the age of 18 when sexually abused can file a civil suit. “We don’t know where he is, what he’s doing, whether he’s with or in proximity to children..and that’s concerning to us,” said Taylor Stippel who works for LaFave, Wein & Frament PLLC law firm representing the victims in these cases. (WBNG) — As the Roman Catholic Diocese of Syracuse files for Chapter 11 bankruptcy, more survivors are coming forward with decades-old accusations against a local former priest and a former Catholic school teacher. Attorney, Cynthia LaFave, says when the Diocese filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy, it blocked several documents of Madore’s records her law office was about to receive. She says the bankruptcy was a way for the Diocese to hide information. The Diocese of Syracuse announced in a press conference on Friday it is declaring bankruptcy in wake of dozens of recent lawsuits and pandemic-related financial struggles. However, the Bishop of Syracuse who has been in his position for almost a year, spoke at a press conference in Syracuse Friday defending himself, saying, “For me, transparency is important, so I’m not hiding anything. In fact, by declaring Chapter 11, we’re not hiding anything saying we just do not have the means to provide the legal costs and also provide settlements.” Former priest of St. Catherine of Siena in Binghamton, Father Edward C. Madore, has five cases against him, accusing him of years-worth of sexual abuse. He was ordained back in 1970 and stayed until 1987 when he left priesthood and disappeared from church records. Madore is believed to be somewhere in Upstate New York, but his specific whereabouts are unknown.last_img read more

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Osterholm says world isn’t ready for flu pandemic

first_img But to really be well prepared for a pandemic, the world needs 10 years of lead time and “a worldwide influenza Manhattan Project aimed at producing and delivering a pandemic vaccine for everyone in the world” soon after the start of a pandemic. “In this scenario, we just might make a real difference,” he states. Osterholm said the United States is ahead of other countries in preparing for a pandemic, but nations can’t deal with the problem singly. A pandemic emerging today would find the world severely short of vaccine production capacity and medical supplies and could bring the global economy to a standstill, writes Osterholm, director of the University of Minnesota Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy, publisher of the Web site. He reported he has already received a lot of supportive feedback on his article. “A lot of people are really wondering where we go next. We need a G-8 [“Group of Eight” countries] initiative for vaccine, and every level of government needs to think about what they’ll do.” The H5N1 virus has killed at least 52 people in Asia in the past 17 months but has shown very limited ability to spread from person to person. If it gained the ability right now to spread quickly among humans while remaining highly virulent, the world would face a grim situation, Osterholm writes. “We need bold and timely leadership at the highest level of the governments in the developed world; these governments must recognize the economic, security, and health threats posed by the next influenza pandemic and invest accordingly,” Osterholm asserts. Osterholm submits that the current system for producing flu vaccine (growing it in chicken eggs) is unlikely ever to be adequate for meeting the challenge of a pandemic. He calls for development of a new cell-culture-based vaccine that would target proteins present in all flu viruses, rather than the surface proteins (hemagglutinin and neuraminidase), which constantly change and necessitate adjustments in the vaccine each year. It would take at least 6 months to produce a vaccine, and with current production capacity, the best that could be expected would be to have fewer than 1 billion doses of vaccine initially, he writes. Since two doses per person might be necessary, that might cover only 500 million people, or about 14% of the world population. Further, the world would face severe shortages of other products and services, including mechanical ventilators, antiviral drugs, and even food. May 5, 2005 (CIDRAP News) ? A bleak picture of the world’s ability to cope with an influenza pandemic is painted in an essay by infectious-disease and bioterrorism expert Michael T. Osterholm, PhD, MPH, in this week’s New England Journal of Medicine. “There would be a scramble to stop the virus from entering other countries by greatly reducing or even prohibiting foreign travel and trade. The global economy would come to a halt, and since we could not expect appropriate vaccines to be available for many months and we have very limited stockpiles of antiviral drugs, we would be facing a 1918-like scenario.”center_img In a brief interview, Osterholm told CIDRAP News there is good agreement among public health and infectious disease experts that a pandemic will occur, though no one knows whether it will be the H5N1 virus or some other one. He added that there is “no debate” about such preparedness gaps as the shortage of vaccine production capacity and ventilators, but said he couldn’t assess the level of agreement on other preparedness issues. Such planning should be “on the agenda of every public health agency, school board, manufacturing plant, investment firm, mortuary, state legislature, and food distributor,” Osterholm asserts. “I think our government is leading the way, but we have a lot of holes in medical and nonmedical preparedness,” he said. And nations need to cooperate on preparedness. “Even if countries are able to cover much of their own populations, the impact will still be dramatic. We’re in this together. . . . It could take down the economy.” He says that if the H5N1 avian flu virus now circulating in Asia sparks the next pandemic, it is more likely to mimic the disastrous pandemic of 1918 than the milder events of 1957 and 1968. Such a plague could kill 1.7 million people in the United States and from 180 million to 360 million worldwide, he estimates. Having a year of lead time before the next pandemic would make for a somewhat better scenario, Osterholm says. That might permit health agencies to find ways to extend the vaccine supply, improve supplies of medical equipment, and increase the healthcare workforce. “Beyond research and development, we need a public health approach that includes far more than drafting of general plans, as several countries and states have done,” the articles says. “We need a detailed operational blueprint of the best way to get through 12 to 24 months of a pandemic.” If the world fails to prepare adequately, he concludes, “The loss of human life even in a mild pandemic will be devastating, and the cost of a world economy in shambles for several years can only be imagined.” Osterholm MT. Preparing for the next pandemic. N Engl J Med 2005 May 5;352(18):1839-42 [Full text]last_img read more

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Gold shines as coronavirus surge unnerves investors

first_imgAll that and softness in the dollar, along with endless cheap liquidity from central banks, helped spot gold gain 0.2% to $1,770.92 per ounce after touching $1,773, its highest level since October 2012 in early Asian trade.Global stocks were 0.3% lower and have been moving sideways in recent weeks after rising more than 40% from March lows on hopes the worst of the pandemic was over.European shares were 1% lower.There was some good news in markets, with emerging market stocks climbing to a 3-1/2 month high. They were up 0.5% on the day, while MSCI’s broadest index of Asia-Pacific shares outside Japan added 0.5% to reach its highest since pandemic lockdowns first cratered markets in early March. E-Mini futures for the S&P 500 reversed early losses to gain 0.1%.”Global equity market futures are struggling to make gains today, likely for no other reason than with rising daily Covid-19 cases in the US remaining front-page news, the headlines are proving to be a weighty burden to bear this morning,” said Stephen Innes, chief global market strategist at AxiCorp. “The trough in global growth is indeed behind us, but the recovery trajectory in H2 remains uncertain.”Against a backdrop of concerns over a weaker US dollar and that a jump in infections will lead to more stimulus measures, gold should remain on a reasonably constructive path, he said.The euro, headed for its best month against the dollar since October, inched higher to $1.1303.The dollar was just a touch negative against a basket of currencies, just above a one-week low hit Tuesday.”The dollar and risk sentiment are likely to remain broadly negatively correlated, barring the US displaying clear and enduring leadership in the global economic recovery, something hard to square with the grim US news on COVID,” said Ray Attrill, head of FX strategy at NAB.The New Zealand dollar eased after the country’s central bank said it might have to do yet more to stimulate the economy, including cutting rates further, expanding bond purchases or even buying foreign assets.Euro zone bond yields were broadly steady, with a focus on Austria which is expected to sell a new 100-year bond that will raise 2 billion euros, one of the longest-dated bond sales since the coronavirus crisis.Germany will also visit the primary market with the first reopening of a 15-year bond which is expected to raise 2.5 billion euros.Oil futures were mixed as worries about oversupply in the market, stoked by a rise in US crude inventories, were offset by a drop in gasoline stocks.Brent crude was up 0.3% at $42.75 a barrel, while US West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude futures fell 1 cents to $40.34 a barrel, paring some earlier losses. Gold prices surged to their highest in nearly eight years on Wednesday, while global shares cooled as signs of an acceleration in coronavirus cases kept investors on edge.Fuelling concerns about sustained weakness in the pace of the economic recovery was data showing several US states seeing record infections and the death toll in Latin America passing 100,000, according to a Reuters tally.The European Union is even prepared to bar US travellers because of the surge of cases in the country, putting it in the same category as Brazil and Russia, the New York Times reported.center_img Topics :last_img read more

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Arsenal abandon Ivan Perisic deal and reignite move for Yannick Carrasco

first_img Metro Sport ReporterWednesday 30 Jan 2019 5:00 amShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link Advertisement Perisic may be off the table, but Arsenal will try to bring Carrasco to north London (Getty)The north Londoners were offered Carrasco – who is unhappy at Chinese side Dalian Yifang – earlier this month and, according to Sky Sport Italia, they are reexploring that option.AdvertisementAdvertisementADVERTISEMENTCarrasco’s camp reached out to Arsenal and made it clear he would be willing to take a significant pay cut to move to the Premier League.More: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man CityDalian have little desire to let him leave, though their position could change if they manage to sign Alassane Plea from Borussia Monchengladbach.Arsenal are also closing in on a deal for Barcelona’s Denis Suarez and, despite Unai Emery seeing the Spaniard as a winger, a move for Carrasco would be in addition to the Barca man, not instead of. Comment Carrasco, who helped Dalian avoid relegation, would jump at the chance to join Arsenal (Getty)Inter sporting director Piero Ausilio effectively confirmed that Arsenal’s interest in Perisic was over, saying: ‘We will reintegrate Perisic in the coming days, we won’t make any deals before the transfer window’s end.‘He wanted to play abroad, but we didn’t receive any offer. Should he stay, I expect him to act as a professional, as he has always done so far. It won’t take long to have him back.’More: Arsenal FCArsenal flop Denis Suarez delivers verdict on Thomas Partey and Lucas Torreira movesThomas Partey debut? Ian Wright picks his Arsenal starting XI vs Manchester CityArsene Wenger explains why Mikel Arteta is ‘lucky’ to be managing Arsenalcenter_img The Croatian winger will not be moving to the Emirates this month (Picture: Getty)Arsenal have abandoned their brief pursuit of Inter Milan winger Ivan Perisic and will instead reignite their interest in Yannick Carrasco, according to reports.The Gunners made a surprise approach for Perisic, though a deal stalled because Inter were unwilling to sanction a loan move without a compulsory obligation to buy the Croatian at the end of his stay for £35million.Despite Perisic training away from the rest of the squad and handing in a transfer request, the Italian side’s stance has not changed prompting Arsenal to pursue other targets. Advertisement Arsenal abandon Ivan Perisic deal and reignite move for Yannick Carrascolast_img read more

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Manchester Uni researchers target tidal turbine degradation

first_imgResearchers from The University of Manchester have released a study which aims to shed more light on the degradation procedures associated with tidal turbines in order to inform more accurate cost projections for potential new installations.Accurate assessment of the fatigue life of tidal stream turbines requires understanding of the unsteady loading of turbine components over a wide range of frequencies.By understanding the different loading patterns, a more accurate design life can be estimated along with overall performance, according to the University of Manchester.New research from the University aims to help improve the accuracy of assessments of the installation and maintenance costs for tidal turbines to determine their feasibility.“Accurate assessment of the fatigue life of tidal stream turbines requires understanding of the unsteady loading of turbine components over a wide range of frequencies. By understanding the different loading patterns, a more accurate design life can be estimated along with overall performance,” according to the University of Manchester.The aim of this project is to develop a better understanding of the performance degradation through the design life of a tidal turbine by determining the effect of the operating conditions on fluctuating load range and cycles.The study, titled ‘Operational loads on a tidal turbine due to environmental conditions’ by Hannah Mullings, Timothy Stallard, Grégory S. Payne, has investigated the loading experienced by the blades due to waves and turbulence over a 6-month time period.The unsteady loading of a rotor and blade is based on experimental data from tests conducted at the IFREMER test facility during 2015, as part of the EPSRC project XMED. The tests were conducted using a 1. 2-meter diameter turbine, approximately 1:15th scale relative to prototype turbines rated at 1MW. The experiments examined the magnitude and frequency range of loading on rotor and blades due to differing levels of onset turbulence and following regular waves.A Morison formulation for predicting time variation of thrust close to the wave frequency was within 3% for the majority of the tests conducted. Using the prediction of wave loads and the load spectrum generated by the experimental data; a prediction of the load cycles and magnitudes is found, the University of Manchester said.These inform an assessment of the extent to which predicted Damage Equivalent Loads (DELs) may vary due to the approach taken for modelling wave-induced loads, turbulence-induced loads and turbine operation.It is hoped that the findings from this research will inform more accurate estimations of turbine duration in a given location and conditions and will thus facilitate more accurate costings for potential new installations.last_img read more

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Ligue 1: PSG aided by own goal in win over Lyon

first_imgParis Saint-Germain survived the absence of Neymar and a Lyon fightback to win Sunday night’s Ligue 1 clash 4-2 at a stormy Parc des Princes, helped by Fernando Marcal’s truly stunning second-half own goal.Advertisement Runaway leaders and defending champions PSG were cruising at half-time with Angel Di Maria and Kylian Mbappe giving them a two-goal advantage against a Lyon side enduring a disappointing season. Then Marcal comically blasted the ball into the roof of his own net just after the break, leaving Lyon looking at another heavy defeat in Paris, where they lost 5-0 in this fixture last season.However, Martin Terrier and Moussa Dembele quickly pulled goals back, and PSG needed a late strike by substitute Edinson Cavani to secure the points.“Normally after a goal like that the game is over,” said coach Thomas Tuchel of the own goal. “But we were not disciplined enough and it was a lesson for us that it’s never over.”PSG’s performance showcased why they can ill afford to be complacent heading into their Champions League last 16, first leg match away to Borussia Dortmund on February 18, even if sporting director Leonardo insisted to Canal Plus that the tie was “not life or death” for the Qatar-owned club.They will hope to have Neymar back by then. The world’s most expensive player sat out a second consecutive match here due to a rib complaint.“We play a lot of games and errors happen but I don’t know if it’s the time to be too critical,” Tuchel added.“The team was great and we can’t forget we were without lots of key players.”Without Neymar – as well as his injured compatriots, Thiago Silva and Marquinhos, in defence – Tuchel’s side made it eight straight wins and stretched their unbeaten run to 21 games in all competitions.Lyon, meanwhile, have not won in three and this result leaves the seven-time former champions in ninth place.They are eight points adrift of the Champions League qualifying spots and their upcoming European double-header against Juventus looks certain to be a step too far for them.– Cavani nears double-century –How Rudi Garcia’s side must have wished this match had been postponed due to the swirling wind and rain caused by Storm Ciara – which left ticker-tape from pre-match fan displays strewn all over the pitch – as they struggled to keep up with PSG in the first half.PSG broke forward to open the scoring midway through the first half as Idrissa Gueye fed Di Maria to cut in from the right and beat Lyon goalkeeper Anthony Lopes with a low strike at his near post.Thomas Meunier then squared for Mbappe to score his 15th league goal of the season in the 38th minute after fine work by Mauro Icardi, and both Icardi and Mbappe also had goals disallowed for offside before the interval.Then, two minutes after the break, came what looked like the coup de grace.An attempted cutback by Julian Draxler was going nowhere before Thiago Mendes intervened, allowing Draxler to keep the ball in play and return it to the edge of the six-yard box, where the hapless Marcal slammed it into the roof of his own net.Nevertheless, Lyon hit back with Terrier’s shot squirming under the body of Keylor Navas before Karl Toko Ekambi teed up Dembele to convert his 13th in the league this season just prior to the hour mark.Paris Saint-Germain saw off a Lyon fightback to win 4-2 at the Parc des Princes on Sunday night FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Read Also:?Ligue 1: Monaco up to fifth after frantic finishMbappe had another effort ruled out and then hit the woodwork, and it was not until the introduction of Cavani – the fans’ favourite reduced to role of bit-part player – that the home side made sure of the points.Di Maria set up the Uruguayan to complete the scoring 10 minutes from time with what was his 199th goal for PSG.They are 12 points clear of Marseille, who beat Toulouse 1-0 on Saturday with a Dimitri Payet goal. Elsewhere on Sunday, Montpellier beat struggling Saint-Etienne 1-0 and Strasbourg won 3-0 against Reims, with both sides staying in touch with the European places. Loading… Promoted ContentThe Very Last Bitcoin Will Be Mined Around 2140. Read MoreA Guy Turns Gray Walls And Simple Bricks Into Works Of Art9 Facts You Should Know Before Getting A Tattoo10 Risky Jobs Some Women Do7 Netflix Shows Cancelled Because They Don’t Get The Ratings7 Reasons Why You Might Want To Become A VegetarianBirds Enjoy Living In A Gallery Space Created For ThemWho Earns More Than Ronaldo?7 Universities In The World With The Highest Market ValueA Hurricane Can Be As Powerful As 10 Atomic BombsCouples Who Celebrated Their Union In A Unique, Unforgettable WayFantastic-Looking (and Probably Delicious) Bread Artlast_img read more

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Wenger set to propose new offside law

first_imgRelatedPosts Lampard: I still have confidence in Tomori Mane double eases Liverpool to win over 10-man Chelsea EPL: Chelsea, Liverpool in cagey duel Arsène Wenger is pressing to change the offside rule in his role as Fifa’s head of global development and his proposal could be passed in time for the Euro 2020 finals. The former Arsenal manager wants a player to be onside if any part of their body that can score a goal is behind or level with the relevant defender. His move follows a series of video assistant referee decisions in which goals have been disallowed because a player has been fractionally offside. A header by Chelsea’s Olivier Giroud against Manchester United on Monday was disallowed because part of his right boot was offside, for example, and Liverpool’s Roberto Firmino had a goal disallowed because of an armpit offside against Aston Villa. “The most difficult (issue) that people have (with VAR) is the offside rule,” Wenger said at the Laureus Sports Awards in Berlin. “You have had offsides by a fraction of a centimetre, literally by a nose. It is the time to do this quickly. “There is room to change the rule and not say that a part of a player’s nose is offside, so you are offside because you can score with that. Instead, you will be not be offside if any part of the body that can score a goal is in line with the last defender, even if other parts of the attacker’s body are in front. “That will sort it out and you will no longer have decisions about millimetres and a fraction of the attacker being in front of the defensive line.” Wenger’s proposals will be considered by the law-making body, the International Football Association Board, on February 29. The FAs of the four UK home nations and four Fifa representatives sit on the board and passing a motion requires a three-quarters majority. A change would come into force on June 1, shortly before the European Championship finals, which start 11 days later. The existing law says: “A player is in an offside position if: any part of the head, body or feet is in the opponents’ half (excluding the halfway line) and any part of the head, body or feet is nearer to the opponents’ goal line than both the ball and the second-last opponent.”Tags: Arsene WengerChelseaFIFALiverpoolOlivier GiroudRoberto Firminolast_img read more

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